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The 5 Most Intelligent Dog Breeds Chosen By Vets

Smartest Dog Breeds

Ever wonder what the smartest dog breed is? In this article, we provide an overview of the world's the smartest dog breeds. These five breeds all have intelligence, loyalty, friendliness, agility, and devotion to their owners in common. If you are the proud pet owner of any of these breeds and are located in the Fox Valley, consider contacting the vets at Countryside Veterinary Services for your canine companion's checkups, vaccinations, and more. This list of smartest dog breeds is based on numerous studies done to test the intelligence of dogs.

Number 5: Golden Retriever

The friendly Golden Retriever is not only a trusting family companion but also one of the smartest dog breeds today. Bred to be sporting dogs, these gentle companions need plenty of exercise that engages both the mind and body. Sturdy, muscular, and ever friendly, they are known for their affectionate, out-going personality. As a sporting breed originally bred in the mid 1800's, Goldens enjoy activities like long runs, bike rides, hunting, and fetching a tennis ball or Frisbee.

If you are the owner of a Golden Retriever, be sure to give your intelligent canine companion daily exercise, which helps to prevent undesirable behavior and keeps your canine friend happy and healthy.

Smart Breeds - Golden Retriever

Golden Retriever Traits

The Golden Retriever is known for its adaptability and affection with family. By nature, these enduring canines are exceptionally child-friendly and get along very well with cats and other dogs. If you're considering adopting a Golden Retriever, consider the following traits to see whether this breed is right for you and your family:

Adaptability

Adaptability:
5

Affection Level

Affection Level:
5

Apartment Friendly

Apartment Friendly:
2

Barking Tendencies

Barking Tendencies:
3

Cat Friendly

Cat Friendly:
4

Child Friendly

Child Friendly:
5

Dog Friendly

Dog Friendly:
5

Exercise Needs

Exercise Needs:
5

Grooming

Grooming:
3

Health Issues

Health Issues:
4

Intelligence

Intelligence:
5

Playfulness

Playfulness:
5

Shedding Level

Shedding Level:
3

Social Needs

Social Needs:
5

Stranger Friendly

Stranger Friendly:
5

Territorial

Territorial:
3

Trainability

Trainability:
5

Watchdog Ability

Watchdog Ability:
3


Number 4: Australian Shepherd

Highly intelligent, work-oriented, and lively, the Australian Shepherd is a breed developed from the Basque Shepherd, Collie, and Border Collie, among others, and was, in fact, developed in the American West, not Australia. Australian Shepherds are known to be one of the most intelligent dog breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club, and are renown for their obedience, agility, and excellence in herding and other active sports. In addition to being kept as beloved pets, Australian Shepherds are also service dogs, therapy dogs, drug detectors, and rescue dogs. This sharp breed is devoted to its owner and displays affection by sitting on your foot or leaning against you.

Smart Breeds - Australian Shepherd

Australian Shepherd Traits

Highly versatile, adaptable, and energetic, the Australian Shepherd enjoys an active lifestyle most. If you plan on owning one of these highly intelligent breeds, be sure to spend time training him. Aussies, as they're often called, are natural-born protectors, and are highly devoted to the people they know. Somewhat wary of strangers, Australian Shepherds need plenty of socialization, so be sure to only adopt a puppy from trusted breeders with a keen sense of how to breed and care for these highly intelligent herding dogs. See the traits below to determine if an Australian Shepherd is right for you:

Adaptability

Adaptability:
5

Affection Level

Affection Level:
4

Apartment Friendly

Apartment Friendly:
3

Barking Tendencies

Barking Tendencies:
5

Cat Friendly

Cat Friendly:
3

Child Friendly

Child Friendly:
5

Dog Friendly

Dog Friendly:
3

Exercise Needs

Exercise Needs:
5

Grooming

Grooming:
3

Health Issues

Health Issues:
3

Intelligence

Intelligence:
5

Playfulness

Playfulness:
5

Shedding Level

Shedding Level:
3

Social Needs

Social Needs:
4

Stranger Friendly

Stranger Friendly:
2

Territorial

Territorial:
5

Trainability

Trainability:
5

Watchdog Ability

Watchdog Ability:
5


Number 3: Poodle

Despite the fluffy coat and prissy face, the Poodle is one highly intelligent breed, sporting a smart brain and great sense of humor. Poodles are energetic dogs and excel at agility and obedience competitions. The Poodle is bred in various sizes, including Standard, Miniature and Toy. Although known as the national dog of France, Poodles originated in Germany and were bred to be duck hunters over 400 years ago.

The Poodle has a muscular body and is an excellent athlete with an impusle to retrieve. Your Poodle will enjoy fetching toys, sticks, balls, or Frisbees, or a long walk or run beside you.

Smart Breeds - Poodle

Poodle Traits

No matter if you choose to adopt a Standard, Miniature, or Toy variety, Poodles make special companions who are renown for their intelligence and trainability. In addition to their smarts, they are graceful, agile, and naturally carry themselves with pride. Are you considering adopting a Poodle? Take a look at the traits below to see whether a Poodle is the right choice for you.

Adaptability

Adaptability:
5

Affection Level

Affection Level:
5

Apartment Friendly

Apartment Friendly:
5

Barking Tendencies

Barking Tendencies:
3

Cat Friendly

Cat Friendly:
4

Child Friendly

Child Friendly:
5

Dog Friendly

Dog Friendly:
4

Exercise Needs

Exercise Needs:
4

Grooming

Grooming:
5

Health Issues

Health Issues:
3

Intelligence

Intelligence:
5

Playfulness

Playfulness:
4

Shedding Level

Shedding Level:
1

Social Needs

Social Needs:
5

Stranger Friendly

Stranger Friendly:
4

Territorial

Territorial:
4

Trainability

Trainability:
5

Watchdog Ability

Watchdog Ability:
4


Number 2: German Shepherd

Originally bred in Germany in the late 1800s, Captain Max von Stephanitz developed the German Shepherd to be the ideal herding dog to guard and protect sheep. Also known as the the Alsatian, this highly intelligent dog was bred to herd sheep and is characterized by agility, stealth, confidence, and loyalty.

German Shepherd Traits

The German Shepherd is a trusted companion who makes a gentle and devoted family pet. A a fearless dog with a natural instinct to protect, the GSD, is also well-known for its military and police work and is also an effective guard dog.

Smart Breeds - German Shepherd

In addition, the German Shepherd is a protective, adaptive family dog, who likes to use his smarts by playing, running, or working. German Shepherds make great companions and are devoted members of the family. Take a look at the traits below to see if the German Shepherd is right for you:

Adaptability

Adaptability:
5

Affection Level

Affection Level:
3

Apartment Friendly

Apartment Friendly:
3

Barking Tendencies

Barking Tendencies:
2

Cat Friendly

Cat Friendly:
3

Child Friendly

Child Friendly:
5

Dog Friendly

Dog Friendly:
2

Exercise Needs

Exercise Needs:
3

Grooming

Grooming:
3

Health Issues

Health Issues:
4

Intelligence

Intelligence:
5

Playfulness

Playfulness:
3

Shedding Level

Shedding Level:
5

Social Needs

Social Needs:
3

Stranger Friendly

Stranger Friendly:
1

Territorial

Territorial:
5

Trainability

Trainability:
5

Watchdog Ability

Watchdog Ability:
5


Number 1: Border Collie

So what is the smartest dog breed? The Border Collie has incredible focus and is arguably considered the world's best herding dog. This breed needs to have something to do because he can wreak havoc in your home if he's bored. Agile, athletic, and highly intelligent, the Border Collie has an iconic intense stare. Extremely people-oriented dogs, they may just try to herd you in!

Border Collie Traits

With the level of energy characteristic of this breed, you will need to plan on giving her lots of exercise. Her owner will need to enjoy spending time outside. Border Collies need something to do every day, and not just a daily walk or brief jog around the backyard - they are canine athletes who excel in herding events and sports like flying disc and flyball.

Smart Breeds - Border Collie

In addition, early socialization is essential to the Border Collie. Obedience training from a young age mental stimulates and encourages the puppy to have positive interactions with humans, animals, and other dogs. If you're considering a Border Collie, this highly intelligent and affectionate breed will be your energetic companion for life!

Adaptability

Adaptability:
5

Affection Level

Affection Level:
5

Apartment Friendly

Apartment Friendly:
2

Barking Tendencies

Barking Tendencies:
5

Cat Friendly

Cat Friendly:
3

Child Friendly

Child Friendly:
5

Dog Friendly

Dog Friendly:
3

Exercise Needs

Exercise Needs:
5

Grooming

Grooming:
2

Health Issues

Health Issues:
3

Intelligence

Intelligence:
5

Playfulness

Playfulness:
5

Shedding Level

Shedding Level:
3

Social Needs

Social Needs:
5

Stranger Friendly

Stranger Friendly:
3

Territorial

Territorial:
5

Trainability

Trainability:
5

Watchdog Ability

Watchdog Ability:
5

What You Need To Know About Canine Heart Disease

Vet Listening to Dog's Heartbeat

Heart disease affects 7 to 8 million dogs in the United States. Canine heart disease is common in many types of dog breeds and can be either congenital or developed later in life. Approximately 75 to 80% of dogs in the United States with heart disease have the variation known as mitral valve disease, a condition in which the mitral valve in the dog's heart degerates and begins leaking.

Smaller breeds of dogs, especially Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Chilhuahuas, Toy Poodles, and Dachshunds are prone to developing mitral valve disease. Meanwhile, larger canine breeds such as Labrador Retrievers, Old English Sheepdogs, Great Danes, German Shepherds and Irish Setters are more likely to develop issues with the tricuspid valve on the right side of the heart.

Large dogs can develop dilated cardiomyopathy, another type of heart disease that weakens the dog's heart muscle. This causes difficulties in contracting and pumping blood, which makes the heart work too hard and enlarge abnormally.

Symptoms

A heart murmur is a sure sign that your dog may have heart disease. Your veterinarian may recommend diagnostic tests to examine your canine's heart and test for how severe the heart condition is. Other signs your dog may be suffering from heart disease is when he or she shows reluctance for excersing, has an abnormal respiration rate, coughs, or has a blue tint on the gums or tongue.

As your dog's heart disease progresses, your canine companion will experience more severe symptoms, including weakness, loss of consciousness, abdominal enlargement from fluid retention, and difficulties lying down.

Prognosis

Although there is no cure for most kinds of canine heart disease, your dog's condition can be managed with medication. An early diagnosis is the best thing you can do for your pet so they can be treated with medication as soon as possible.

The good news is that even when your canine companion's heart disease is severe or congestive heart failure has developed, if he or she is treated as soon as possible they can still live a high quality of life for a good amount of time.

5 Cat Training Mistakes to Avoid

cat training

Are you making cat training mistakes with your felines? Here are five common cat training mistakes for pet owners to avoid:

  1. Assuming that it takes large blocks of time to train your cat. Cats are intelligent animals and learn best in short training sessions that are spread periodically throughout the day. Large blocks of training time are overwhelming and unnecessary for both you and your feline.
  2. Acknowledging bad behavior and ignoring good behavior. Cats like to receive attention from their owners. If they realize that you give them attention every time they climb an indoor tree or scratch furniture, they will continue the bad behavior. The way to reverse your cats' behavior is instead of scolding them whenever they misbehave, either ignore the behavior or distract them with something else. By contrast, praise your felines whenever they demonstrate good behavior, such as using their scratching post instead of your sofa.
  3. Punishing instictive behavior. Natural cat behaviors, such as climing, jumping, clawing, pouncing, etc., are behaviors that pet owners may find inappropriate and may respond by punishing their cat's natural instincts. To encourage your cat towards good behavior, invest in shelving, perches, cat trees, etc., for your cat to explore and quench his or her thirst for climbing and jumping. Toys, boxes and laundry baskets are also great alternatives to keep your cat entertained. Finally, play with your cats, and encourage them to use their cat trees, boxes and other toys as this will help to curb their interest in jumping onto your kitchen table and countertops.
  4. Expecting your feline to understand you without any training. Your cat does not instinctually understand what "no" means. For example, if you need your cat to get off he counter, instead of punishing the bad behavior and yelling "No!", encourage future good behavior by immediately placing your cat on his or her cat tree after he or she was being naughty. Use positive reinforcement with your cat always and in time, they will learn with consistent training what "no" means.
  5. Setting unrealistic training goals for your cat. Don't push your feline to learn so much so fast as this can be overwhelming for both you and your cat. Remember that not all cats are the same as some will receive training and changes in their environment better than others. Above all, remember to have patience with your cat -- the rewards will be long-lasting.

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All hours subject to change

Appointment Hours

Monday - 8:00 am - 4:30 pm

Tuesday - 8:00 am - 4:30 pm

Wednesday - 8:00 am - 4:30 pm

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CountrySide Veterinary Services

CountrySide Veterinary Services
W3022 Edgewood Trail
Appleton, Wisconsin 54913
CountrySide Veterinary Health
2101 E Evergreen Drive
Appleton, WI 54913